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When multi-disciplinary team efforts feel blocked...

In my professional role, I refer children and young people via the safeguarding officer based in our Pupil Referral Unit, to CAMHS. I am told that there is a waiting list of 18 months. I am aware of the limits of my therapeutic intervention, also aware of alternative interventions that might work better, but the child or young person, cannot get the right treatment at the time of need. This causes me to feel as if I am powerless and sometimes continue to work with the child / young person until a solution can be found, and tend to feel overloaded. To achieve my true professional capacity, I need to work within the capacity I am capable of working. Feeling overworked naturally can reduce my existing capacity to care therapeutically.

(Account removed) 2 months ago

That must be very difficult given how hard you work and it sounds like you care for every young person you see. Have you seen the response to the children and young people's mental health green paper that the Department of Health & Social Care and Department of Education published earlier this year? https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/t...n-a-green-paper

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Yonca Ozkaya 2 months ago

Thank you, Amy.
I had a chance to provide my perspectives during the consultation period via my professional organisation BACP.
I had not seen the result of that consultation. Thank you again.
I shall read it.
Best wishes,
Yonca Ozkaya

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(Account removed) 2 months ago

Hi Yonca, have you had chance to read the consultation response? I'd love to hear what you thought of the report

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Yonca Ozkaya 2 months ago

Hello, Amy.
I did not have a chance yet.
Hope to respond to you in detail as soon as feasable.
Kind regards,
Yonca

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Yonca Ozkaya 1 month ago

Hi, Amy.
I had a chance to look at the Response to the C + YP MH Green Paper:

It details a comprehensive and, as stated, a very complex programme. I noted the wise, cautious approach to ensure a pace that could deliver the hoped-for outcome.

Early intervention is a must. The problems that surface at teenage development are rooted in the early developmental ages. I welcome the focus on supporting pregnant women as this would ensure the new generation can be held and contained in the best way possible.

If I may refer to a programme - called SAFE, developed 11 years ago at Munich University by Dr Karl-Heinz Brisch and his team - does exactly that, enabling expectant mothers to understand what might have gone wrong for them in their early development, thus providing them with constructive parenting skills.

My therapeutic work with adults at a voluntary sector counselling organisation emphasise the importance of supporting the parents. The current level of challenge we face when working with C + YP is linked to their parents' emotional struggles rooted in their own childhood. Since August, 8 out of 10 adults I assessed who have young children expressed suicidal feelings and intentions. I welcome the focus on multi-disciplinary team co-operation as families need diverse support which would help the C + YP. Before the cuts affected such a co-operation, I had cases where significant transformation was observed within most disadvantaged families as a result of such interventions.

I welcome the four week waiting time standard as C + YP need help when they struggle, as stated. It is not a 'later', but a 'now', approach that can contribute to hoped-for changes.

Eating disorders and psychotic states are linked to early interruptions in emotional development involving malfunctioning attachments.

The Safeguarding Officer in PRU, where I work, has started to study for an MA Leadership of School Mental Health and Wellbeing. She knows all the C + YP in our unit, has an impressive capacity to tune in with their needs and is an ideal candidate for a leadership role.

The proposed compulsory curriculum on MH needs to involve the parents in one form or another. The schools need the parents' co-operation to ensure the curriculum is implemented as hoped. The parents / grandparents can be very sensitive to guidance which they tend to perceive as being critical of them.

The transition from secondary / sixth form to college / university and related MH issues could be more easily resolved at the time of transition from primary to secondary school.

If the parents get the right support, the proposed disclosure agreement could prove helpful. The MH problems displayed by students at universities are linked to attachment problems with the parents / caregivers. Unless both parties are supported in an appropriate way, there cannot be any change in their interactions.

The whole family context, as stated, sounds constructive. Likewise, problems in schools can best be approached if the teachers are supported to tune in emotionally when faced with challenging behaviour. I trust the same principle will enhance the communication between the patients and the medical professionals. C + YP and adults tend to resist any support that sees them as a case number and not as an individual human.

Best wishes,

Yonca

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