Talk Health and Care

Workstream for the Long Term Plan

How can we better support our clinical workforce?

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Working in the NHS is demanding but rewarding. There are many careers and opportunities in the NHS, in the community and in hospital and ward settings – dieticians, radiographers, pharmacists, paramedics, healthcare scientists, midwives, nurses… far too many to name here, but every role is essential.

Each role requires skill, expertise and compassion, and we want to attract the very best people to work in the NHS.

But over the past decade, clinical workforce growth has not kept up with the increasing demands on our health service. As in many other countries, an ageing population, advances in care and treatment, and complexity mean that our staff are feeling the strain.

The challenge is substantial, but we are committed to ensuring we have enough staff with the right skills and experience. The Long Term Plan includes important commitments to recruit, train, and retain more staff. However, given the scale of the challenge, we know we could do more.

We want to hear from you about how we can improve supply, recruitment and retention in all settings, from general practice to acute, mental health and community care.

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In order to have the correct clinical workforce you need to know what the correct clinical workforce is. There is an urgent need for all organisations to fully understand their demand and know what capacity and skill mix is needed to meet it. Scheduling provides that answer, a vital prerequisite to e-rostering. It provides safety for staff and provides realistic expectations from managers.

Carl Powner
by Carl Powner
0 Votes
Comments 1
Carl Powner
PANEL QUESTION

What do you see as the top three priorities in the healthcare science workforce that this implementation plan should address?

Brad Kay
by Brad Kay
0 Votes
Comments 2
Brad Kay
PANEL QUESTION

How do we make AHPs a career of choice to stimulate and incentivise applications?

Brad Kay
by Brad Kay
0 Votes
Comments 2
Brad Kay

•The NHS Long Term Plan announces that Type 2 diabetes prevention is a priority (NHS England, 2019) •NHS England aims to deliver Type 2 diabetes prevention programme to 200,000 patients per year by 2020 •The challenge therefore is to have the capacity and resources to deliver structured education to the numbers of diabetes patients and deliver it in a timely manner. To ensure that Trafford General hospital are delivering Type 2 structured education to newly diagnosed as well as longer...

Rachael Robinson
by Rachael Robinson
0 Votes
Comments 1
Rachael Robinson

It seems to me that the only way to address the delayed discharges who are in hospital but shouldn't be in hospital is a different approach.  The problems that we encounter now are the same problems as they were 20 years ago but the volume has increased.  I am all for long term solutions to community care and stopping people coming into hospital to being with. However, in my opinion the NHS is either a consequence of bad decisions taken in the past or a lovely vision and long term plan.  We...

Debra Wilis
by Debra Wilis
1 Votes
Comments 1
Debra Wilis

There needs to be more support and incentive for entry into professions such as nursing. The number of people enrolling on nursing courses is reducing rapidly every year. Although when I trained, I was lucky enough to receive the NHS bursary, this was around £300 pounds a month, not enough to cover my rent so I had to take out a loan and work part time alongside my studies. This is very difficult for people who have families, rent to pay and dependants to support. Some people dropped out of...

Emily92
by Emily92
0 Votes
Comments 1
Emily92
by
Emily92

why doesn't the NHS employ and retain more experienced ward based nurses? why isn't there a legal limit to the nurse patient ratio? Why do we record acuity levels? why don't we have legal standard setting for skill mix for ward based RGN's

Scott Barbour
by Scott Barbour
0 Votes
Comments 1
Scott Barbour

Past service cuts have reduced the number of posts to middle and senior clinicians. Not only does this mean losing mid-career clinicians to other roles and organisations, but it also means that junior clinicians are left with less support and less options for career progression. Workforce planning to reinstate senior roles, working flexibly across an organisation and talent management to encourage and support promising early career clinicians to step up needed

Sally Morgan
by Sally Morgan
0 Votes
Comments 1
Sally Morgan

Look I understand the need for clinical input into what can be seen as admin tasks but it is time to face reality that there are far too many systems that don't talk to each other and far too many Arcadian processes that doctors, nurses and other health professionals are expected to work with.  The NHS top brass waste millions on outside consultants but they never address this point fully.  If the staff don't exist to fill the vacancies and we have to find better and new ways of working then...

Debra Wilis
by Debra Wilis
0 Votes
Comments 1
Debra Wilis
PANEL QUESTION

We need  to think about how we can further help the NHS retain staff. We recognise that no one action will boost retention on its own – sustained action in several areas is needed. We also know that external factors like private sector wage growth, the strength of the pound and the increasing demands of a clinical role in the NHS all make it difficult to retain staff. But it’s also true that there is plenty more we can do to help retain our staff and we want to hear your ideas.

Eilidh Murray
by Eilidh Murray
0 Votes
Comments 4
Eilidh Murray
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